Tag Archives: CW Network

Quick Review: Superman & Lois on The CW

Last week, the CW Network rolled out the newest addition to it’s lineup of “Arrowverse” shows set in the DC Comics universe; Superman and Lois

Thanks to the events of the Arrowverse version of the “Crisis on Infinite Earths”; Superman and Lois are now older and have a 14 year old twin sons. Meet Jonathan and Jordan Kent:

Jonathan is the one with the blond hair and necklace…

Not as revolutionary an idea as you think. Clark and Lois have a son about that age in the actual comic books who is also named Jonathan (named after his grandfather):

In fact, he’s the current Superman in the latest twisting of the DC Universe. That’s a WHOLE different post to explain however… Let’s get back to the show instead.

Spoilers Ahead:

If you haven’t seen episode 1 yet, it’s probably on the CW’s website. Otherwise, spoilers ahead. Episode 2 is tomorrow though.

The show starts out briefly introducing the current state of the Kent family before Lois and Clark have to head off to work at the Daily Planet. It apparently has been bought out by some internet media conglomerate and is laying off most of the staff. Clark is among those that get the axe. Right afterwards, he gets called away to stop a nuclear reactor from melting down. During that process, we learn that Lois’s dad, General Sam Lane knows Clark’s identity. Significant since Lane has been an anti-alien xenophobic borderline nut in the comics at times. Right now, he’s working with Superman though.

After the reactor is saved, Clark learns his mother has just died of a stroke. Everybody heads back to Smallville (which is NOT the same town or Kent farm that was used in the Smallville show but both are VERY VERY close in appearance).

For the sake of leaving some surprises, I’ll simply leave it that the episode wraps up with Lois and Clark deciding it’s better for the family if they live on the farm in Smallville.

As a side note, there are a few stories dropped about Clark’s past in Smallville that could easily be taken as events from the Smallville series.

My Opinion:

Before the show was even released, I had heard that it was going to focus on the human side of Superman and the family dynamics of the Kents; how Clark has trouble protecting the world and being there for his kids. I went into the premiere with an admitted negative bias.

Happily, I was proven wrong in my expectations. Instead of being yet another excuse for the Far Left to trash a cultural icon, the show was pretty even handed and realistic in it’s presentation of Clark’s struggles with balancing duty and family. It’s a good show that balances the human side of Clark and the struggles of his sense of obligation and right.

IF they keep the same storytelling approach, I think we have another Smallville in the making.

This one is definitely worth watching, and probably the best Arrowverse show thus far. Less emo than Arrow or Flash, even with Jordan having social anxiety disorder.

Quick side notes: John Diggle from Arrow is joining the show, and there will be a Superman & Batwoman crossover later this year that MAY explain what actually happened to the Arrowverse’s MIA Batman.

Devilishly Good News

In honor of my hitting 666 followers today:

Yeah, I know… I don’t know whether to cringe or celebrate, LOL…

Still, I have some good news that’s vaguely related if you’re superstitious. 😯

Lucifer was renewed for Season 6 at Netflix!

I guess this is old news for truly rabid fans of the show. Like Seasons 4 and 5, I’d heard alot of up and down about if it was going to happen. Last I’d heard, it was a no-go.

Those who have followed me carefully for any amount of time know I’m not big on evil or glorifying it, so I admit this show’s premise was hard for me to swallow when I first heard about it. HOWEVER, I loved it once I started watching. Here’s the rundown:

THE BASIC PREMISE:

The show is based on the Lucifer comic books by Vertigo (a subsidiary of DC Comics) and developed by Neil Gaiman, the creator of American Gods. Safe to say he has a strong interest in religion and myth, lol.

Anyhoo, Lucifer gets bored of ruling over Hell, and decides he needs a break. He goes to Los Angeles and opens up a Night Club there. He also frequently plays piano for the crowd, as a side note. After a murder case lands at the doorstep of his night club (named Lux), he decides police work is amusing and weasels his way into becoming a consultant for the LAPD, and gets partnered with Detective Chloe Decker.

His consulting typically takes the form of knowing shady people (who end up providing leads on cases), and being able to get people to tell him their deepest wish, OR outright scaring the literal hell out of them by showing them his true nature. Of course he’s super strong and has a few other abilities also.

The Neil Gaiman Twist: Lucifer’s Character

In order to make Lucifer a more palatable character for audiences, the writers went OLD OLD school, and reverted Lucifer from the modern boogeyman to more of a loose interpretation of old (perhaps traditional would be a better word) Judaism. Lucifer is more of a jailer and punisher who watches over Hell (or used to in this case). As he puts it “I don’t MAKE people do anything, I just punish them for it.”

The “Prosecuting Attorney” aspect of Lucifer is missing. He’s also humorously hedonistic, and self-absorbed to the point of being completely obtuse and clueless at points. He did still rebel against Heaven in the show, and has daddy issues because of it.

he actually goes to therapy also, and his counseling sessions are some of the true highlights of a show that is literally overflowing with wry, dry humor.

They were actually a little funnier in the first two seasons, when Linda thought Lucifer was speaking in metaphors about being the devil. The one below is a bit profound actually, and I suspect was Neil Gaiman’s influence / interpretation.

Season 1, Episode 6… A fairly profound counseling session after Lucifer tries to come to terms with having his self-amputated wings stolen. She doesn’t know yet that he really is THE Lucifer.

Over the course of the four seasons I’ve watched thus far, “Luci” has actually grown a bit ‘as a person’ also.

There have been a few biblical ‘guest stars’ also; Tom Welling of Smallville fame played Cain in Season 3. Cain turned out to be the big villain for the season also. At first it looked like he was a good guy operating as a LAPD Lieutenant and trying to make amends for his past sin(s). Lucifer’s “Mother” also appears, as do a few non-scripture angels and demons. THE Eve also appears in Season 4 as Lucifer’s foil, and I understand Micheal the Archangel appears in Season 5. In the show and comics, he’s Lucifer’s “twin” brother (in the comics he has blond hair and blue eyes).

The Crisis on Infinite Earths:

Probably one of the most fun scenes for fans of Lucifer and the CW Network’s lineup of DC Comics related shows was when the CW did their own version of DC’s now-legendary “Crisis on Infinite Earths” story arc. The story arc was the first reboot of the DC Comics Universe.

As the name suggests, there was a great deal of hopping between alternate realities as the heroes try to stop the threat. In the scene below, John Constantine and friends pay a visit to Lucifer looking for some assistance with the threat:

What truly makes the show Lucifer great though is more than the outstanding writing. Every on the show seems to fit PERFECTLY into their respective role and into the group dynamic of the show. Tom Ellis does a perfect job portraying Lucifer, and the same can be said for all the other actors.

I’ll be honest. IF you’re a strict “The Devil is responsible for all the world’s evil” kind of interpretation person, you’ll very likely be offended by the show. If you have a sense of humor, enjoy someone tripping over their own foibles regularly but growing SLOWLY, and understand that human misery is created by humans, you’ll likely LOVE this show.

Personally, I highly recommend it… To all my 666 followers, LOL. 😈

Supergirl Skirtless

Never let it be said I can’t write a headline that gets attention, LOL.

This one isn’t another piece of erotica though, it’s brief commentary on the CW Network show and Neofeminism.  For those who haven’t heard, the CW, at the urging of the show’s producer (Sarah Schechter) and star (Melissa Benoist), are eliminating the skirt from Supergirl’s outfit and switching her to pants.

SUPERGIRL-New-Supersuit

I have to admit, looking at it just on it’s face, it’s not a bad costume.  For me, it’s the “why” that is disturbing…

In an interview I read online, they both see this as such a bold and empowering move and are very proud of doing it.  This kind of situation is where I get in trouble with the extreme end of the “feminist” movement.  I see the story, and all I can think is “How did we get to a point in feminism where acting or dressing like a woman is a display of weakness?”

Isn’t this the exact opposite of feminism?  It used to be at least.  “Back in the day”, the goal was for women to be able to be women, yet still seen as strong and capable.  NOW, Supergirl is immature and weak unless she’s dressing like Superman.

OK, let’s address the obvious…  Supergirl’s skirt is (usually) on the short side; about cheerleader length.  It’s varied in comic books though from there to knee length.  Most Basic little black dresses that 20 somethings wear to the club are just as short if not shorter though.

Long story short; Supergirl’s (or any woman’s) status as an adult should have little to do with how she dresses.  What makes a person an adult is how they carry themselves.  Can they think of others or just themselves?  Can they make tough decisions and make sacrifices to get ahead in life or do they whine, cry and expect society to carry them and want everything NOW?  Qualifiers for men or women in my opinion.

Women used to be admired for projecting a quieter, more dignified strength than men.  Still are in most quarters (or I’d like to think so anyway).  Somewhere along the line though, the feminist movement (parts of it at least), got the very screwed up idea that a woman can only be strong and equal if she’s acting and looking like a man.