Cooking: Not Every Experiment Works…

At least not completely. 🙂 Sometimes, however, you’re left short of normal ingredients and have to improvise. The whole premise of the Food Network program “Chopped” is about being able to wing it like that via combining a basket of mystery ingredients into a meal. Sometimes winging it works, sometimes… well… not so much.

Such is the case with a recent meal I put together. We decided on my world famous meatloaf for that night; simple and hearty. Well, as it turned out, the meatballs I was going to mix in with the hamburger had gone bad. Not wanting to run out to the store again, I found some linguica in the cold drawer of the fridge.

Oddly enough, the brand we buy down here.

Linguica is a Portuguese sausage that’s good in a wide variety of dishes. Most notably (although I’ve only seen it on the West Coast), it’s one of the world’s greatest pizza toppings. Try it that way if you can find it in your area. You’ll love it.

So, determined to try something a little different and keep the meal on course, I diced up the linguica and mixed it into the meatloaf

Baked it as usual, since the weather didn’t allow for smoking it on the grill. On the surface, it turned out fairly well:

After coming out of the bread pan

The one drawback however, was that linguica can be as greasy as chorizo… almost anyway. Thus despite having both bread crumbs and egg as binding agents, the meatloaf didn’t hold together too well.

The meatloaf did have enough grease to leave us both with mildly upset stomachs though. Not a horrible dinner, but not the success I’d have wished for either. The flavor of the linguica really did add to the meatloaf though.

What I’d Change:

So what lessons can we take from this? The first and obvious answer is to use a less greasy sausage if you want to use sausage as a second meat in your meatloaf. The other option that came to mind us to use something like this meatloaf pan from Bed Bath and Beyond:

You can get something like this almost anywhere with a little searching. The interior rack allows grease to drain off the meatloaf (which would have been a big help in this specific instance), and allows you to easily remove the meatloaf from the pan.

Worth the investment? I guess that depends how often you make meatloaf. It’s a bit of a rarity here, but still something we enjoy on occasion.

2 thoughts on “Cooking: Not Every Experiment Works…

    1. Silk Cords Post author

      If you recall the previous post, for the smoker, I hand mold it and put it on a sheet tray with holes in it (intending for grilling veggies) so that it gets as much smoke flavor as possible.

      Grease isn’t normally THAT big a problem. Even the beef I use for everything is 85 / 15. While I love linguica, that definitely put this one a bit over the top there, LOL

      Like

      Reply

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